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The forty-seven persons who took part in the Debora expedition were:-

Captain Tobiassen and wife, mate Berentsen and wife, mate Oftedal, A Olsen and wife, I Iversen and wife, O Heidalsvig and wife, J Finsen and wife, K Bang and wife with three children (Amanda, Severin and Knut), F Larsen and wife with six children (Angel, Emil, Sigvart, the three sons of the late Sivert Andersen Hordnes, and Petra, Ludvig and Karl), H Johnsen and wife with three children (Sina, Josefine and Karl), A Andreassen and wife with three children (I don't remember their names), R Andersen, R Rasmussen, K Jensen, Hesselberg, Grang, O Fosdal, E Eriksen, P Bang, E Ellingsen, widow Egelandsdal and Miss Serene Larsen.

Two children were born on the voyage, as mentioned, namely: a son to Mr and Mrs F Larsen and a son to Mr and Mrs Andreassen.

NB: The underlined names are those passengers whose descendants have been located by Michael Fisk.
 
 



Listed below is information about the Debora received from:-

Mr Yngve Nedrebø and Mr Bjørn Davidsen - SAB.Riksarkivet Bergen.
Mr Nils Kristian Høimyr <[email protected]> - Retired Archivist of the Norwegian Missionary Society (NMS)
Borge Solem


Item 1

Subject: Debora Date: 04 Feb 1998 13:57:22 Z

Mr. Michael B. Fisk, 13 Homefield Road, Seaford, East Sussex, England, BN 25 3 DG has made available a lot of information about the Debora people. He is the great-grandson of Elling Eriksen, and great-great grandson of Erik Ellingsen, both of Debora.

Mr. Michael B. Fisk is in contact with Heidalsvik (Norwegian H|idalsvik) and Gorven (Norwegian Gjørven), both families living in South Africa, and both families with relatives on Debora. He has also given the address of Grace Lagnest{l, Aprilgatan 1A, 2 tr, S-415 15 G\TEBORG, SWEDEN, a descendant of Mr. and Mr.s Heidalsvik on Debora. Mr. Fisk has also been in contact with members of the Bang family in South Africa.

At the BergenArchives there have been visitors from Australia, being great-grandchildren of emigrants on Debora, their addresses are not on record. One brother of Mr. Fisk lives in Australia.

Tobiassen, the Captain of Debora, returned to his farm Eikeland in Lyngdal, Norway, and raised a family after returning. His son was a minister of the Norwegian Church, and his family still lives in Norway.

Rasmus Elias Rasmussen of Debora was born  25. Feb. 1854, in Bergen, and a good friend of Brother Larsen on Debora. Rasmus Rasmussen called himself "Seaman James" and wrote a 24 page long history of the Debora expedition, given to us in both Norwegian and English by Mr. Fisk. Rasmus Rasmussen returned to Norway, had several children born while living in Bergen, then in 1906 emigrated to America with his wife and children: Wife Ingebor Andrea Rasmuss. , born 8. Oct. 1859  in Bergen Rasmus Johan Rasmuss. , born  17. Jan 1883 Durban Natal Syd Afrika, died in Bergen 1902 Elias Rasmuss., born   15. Nov. 1888     (died in Minnesota, USA May 1972, zip-code 55 424) Ingeborg Erika Rasmuss. K D, born 12. Nov. 1890 in Bergen Ruth, born Jan. 19, 1893 in Bergen Johannes Martin, born Oct. 28, 1895 in Bergen Halfdan, born Nov. 24, 1897 in Bergen, (died in Missouri, USA in April 1975, zip-code 45840) Magdalena Marie, born Dec. 22, 1900 in Bergen

Madame Nicole PEPIN, 108, rue Lemercier, F-750 17 Paris, FRANCE has been looking for information about Olaf Olsen Fosdal, born January 26, 1857 in Bergen, and died February 12, 1924 in Baltimore, USA. He is Mr. Fosdal on Debora, and had a child in Tulear, being the forefather of Henri PEPIN, born 1943 in Tulear.

Vidar Holum, Landingsv. 132, N-0767 Oslo, Norway has been looking for Hesselberg, on Debora, and he most likely is identical with Andreas Christian Hesselberg, an engineer who died on the steamer Trajan Dec. 6, 1885 on his trip from Natal to Norway. He was 27 years old at the time of death.
 


Item 2

David Hansen from Marburg SA, who now lives in Stavanger passed on the information that the the DEBORA story is available on Internet. This work is appreciated. There are records of some of the AGNES people and the Debora people, but it was great to have this new information. O. Fosdal became a captain on english ship(s). His son was taken care of by the missionary R.L. Aas in Morondava, Madagascar for a period of time. Hangervik stayed in Madagascar for years, often helping Aas in difficult times. He died at Nosy Be and was buried there. Andreassen family we have their sad story also. Konstanse born 14 December 1872 (twins). migrated from Norway after her two brothers died there. Hope to continue about reading this fascinating story.


Item 3 

Subject:
Debora
Date:
28 Feb 1998 06:42:58 Z
From:
Yngve Nedrebo <[email protected]>
To: [email protected]


Dear Mr. David Larsen,

I think we have the information now to tell the story of the vessel Debora:

Built 1878 in Gravdal, Fjelberg (south of Bergen). Bought for 20.000 Norwegian kroners by A. Grung and associates in Bergen in August 1878. L. Christophersen was made master of the vessel for a trip to Spain August 23, 1878, from Spain the vessel went on to South-Africa. The vessel returned from Carlstown to Bergen with coal March 26, 1879.

April 20, 1879 the news-paper Bergensposten told the story of Norwegian colonisation of a few islands north of Madagascar (see enclosed copies), and there they also told the readers that the emigrants just these days are buing the vessel Debora for N. kr. 11.600. The vessel is new, and bought just seven months ago for 20.000, the paper states. The journey to Madagascar was scheduled to the last days of May, but as several of the members of the Debora company with-drew, the departure was delayed. At the departure they still had debitors in Bergen, so A. Grung is still registered as the owner of the vessel in Norwegian papers 1880 and 1881.

The vessel made the trip to Madagascar, went on to Natal, and they put the vessel up for sale Dec. 4, 1879. After several rounds of disappointments, the vessel was sold (February 1881) to Torstein Tobiassen (Egeland) (born 1842, died 1936). He owned the vessel for a few years, then sold it to a creol around 1884, and soon thereafter Torstein Tobiassen returned to Lyngdal in Norway. Tobiassen told his son Tobias Bernhard Tobiassen (born 1891 in Lyngdal, Norway) that Debora had sunk at the coast of South-Africa soon after the vessel had been sold.

We send in an envelope:
Copies from Bergensposten April 20, 1879, Jan. 5, 1880,and Feb. 11, 1880. (The typed version is attached to this mail). Copies from the 1875-census with the entries of Fredrik Johan Larsen and family, maps showing Leirvik in Laksev}g (Askøy),and ]rstad with Krohnviken.


Sincerely


Yngve Nedrebø

-------------------------------


Part 1.2

Subject:
The three vessels "Debora"
Date:
25 Feb 1998 14:02:28 Z
From:
Yngve Nedrebo <[email protected]> To:
[email protected]

Dear David Larsen - Salbu

Thanks to Bjørn Davifsen and Odd Henriksen of Det Norske Veritas the mysterium of the three vessels Debora has found its final conclusion:

Debora (1) was built in 1855, owned Jan. 1, 1879 by M Hansen in Trondheim, 38 tons and mastered by C. Christoffersen. This vessel was classified by Veritas as "B1 2 years".

Debora (2) was built in 1872, owned by P. O. Dyrdal, 88 tons, mastered by P. O. Dyrdal. This vessel later came into the ownership of Johannes Vangsnes, and ended up in Porsgrunn, Norway 1926. This vessel was classified as "A1 3years".

Debora (3) was built in 1878, owned by A. Grung in Bergen, 81 tons, registered in Bergen and mastered by L. Christophersen. The ship was registered by Veritas in August 1878 and classified as "A1 7years". This vessel made one trip with Christoffersen to Spain, and returned from "Carlstown" in Feb. 1879. This vessel was bought in March/April 1879 by the "Debora company", changed into 92 tons, and sailed to Madagascar in July 1879. This Debora never came back to Bergen, and was offered for sale in Natal Mercur Dec. 4, 1879.
 
Sincerely


Yngve Nedrebø.

DVL Note: See Yngve Nedrebø E-mail dated 28 Feb 1998 : "The vessel [Debora (3)] made the trip to Madagascar, went on to Natal, and they put the vessel up for sale Dec. 4, 1879. After several rounds of disappointments, the vessel was sold (February 1881) to Torstein Tobiassen (Egeland) (born 1842, died 1936). He owned the vessel for a few years, then sold it to a creol around 1884, and soon thereafter Torstein Tobiassen returned to Lyngdal in Norway. Tobiassen told his son Tobias Bernhard Tobiassen (born 1891 in Lyngdal, Norway) that Debora had sunk off the coast of South-Africa soon after the vessel had been sold."


---------------------------------------

Subject:
Debora - once more!
Date:
22 Feb 1998 08:41:37 Z
From:
Yngve Nedrebø <[email protected]> To:
[email protected]

We have looked into the Veritas system of classification. A1 is the highest class - 7 years refers not to the age of the ship, but to the period the classification counts for.

This means there is no contradiction in the Natal Mercur notes, and I will have to accept that there were two Debora's in Bergen in 1879, both of which travelled to South Africa, and that the one built in 1878 must be the one that left Bergen in July 1879.

Sincerely

Yngve Nedrebø

---------------------------------------------

Borge Solem wrote:

Hi David

I fund a picture of the Debora in "Norge pa Havet", a book of 4 volumes about Norwegian maritime history. The same picture is printed in a magazine "Slekt og Data", no. 4 1997, in an article written by Yngve Nedrebo. Here is some information from the article:

Debora was built in Kvinherreds Prstegjeld (Parish) in Sondre Bergenh. Amt, (Rosendal) 1871-72, by Torris Knudsen Skaaluren age 49, and Jens Knudsen Vaag, a 38 year old farmer. Torris Knudsen Skaaluren was the boss. The ship hull was "kravel" built (I don't know how to explain this, but it means that the planks were set side by side, not overlapping each other) She had a length (keel) of 67 feet, from bow to stern 77 feet. (Length also given to be 20 m. by Nedrebo) Dept by the mast was 9,4 feet, and beam 21,4 feet. (ref. Sunnhordaland tingbok I.A. 57a, 1870-1874, fol. 116)

The article mentions that the son of Larsen born on the ship Aug. 17th, was given the name "Atlanter". (from the Erik Ellingsen account 1925)

Regards, Borge Solem

DVL NOTE : The above would be Debora (2) and not Deobra (3)

===========================================

DEBORA of BERGEN (fort) of Capt. L T HANDELAND
See Image attached:  DeboraHandeland.jpg

Debora Information file

Jagtgaleas Debora.
Signalflag:  X 24
Kjendingbokstaver: 1. P. K. B.
Bygget 1872 i Rosendal, Sondhordland. Indkjopt fra Skudesneshavn I juni 1872.
Draegtighet:  42 kommercelaester ifolge maalebrev av 26de juni 1872.  - 81.16 netto og 95.02 brutto reg. ton.
Forere:  T. Torbjornsen, S. P. Handeland (1875) og I N Vangsnaes.
Rederier:  Erik Schmidt m. fl., Karl Lehmann m. fl. (fra 1876), senere I N Vangsnaes, Sogn, og Lars N Solberg (Bergen) m. fl. (1904).
Billedet er malt I vandfarve 1875 av F S (F Sorvig) I kapt Handelands foretid.  Jagten sees seilende for bidevind (baade for styrbords og bakbords halser).
Kompanimerket E S (Erik Schmidt) sees I flaget paa agtermastens top.
Fartoiet foretok I sin tid en reise fra Bergen til Kapstaden med utvandrere til Natal.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

DVL NOTE :

We now know there were three Nowegian vessels called Debora - the first Debora was circa 45 ton - the other two were cirac 90 ton.

The above Debora Information file may, or may not, be associated with the photograph with the title DEBORA of BERGEN (fort) of Capt. L T HANDELAND (see image titled Debora - Cpt LT Handeland.jpg) This photograph  of Jagtgaleas Debora together with the Debora Information file was given to me Mr Falk of the Historic Museum Bergen. He told me at the time  that there were two nearly identical Debora vessles. The newest Debora was the one that left Bergen for Aldabra.

1971-06-10 Thursday  am DVL Visit to Historic Museum  -  Mr Kjell Falk
Mr Kjell Falk told me the Debora Story,  has copy of Ludwig Larsen Book called "Life Before Death",  this book is autobiography of Ludwig Larsen and gives information about the Debora Expedition. Mr Kjell Falk gave me copy of German newspaper article about the Debora and showed me a model of the ship Debora in a large glass case,  the proposed expedition to Aldabra by the Debora was of historic interest. 
Mr Falk gave me two photographs of "Jagtgaleas" as per the Debora


David Victor Larsen - 981030

-----------------------------------------------------------

Hi David

I fund a picture of the Debora in "Norge på Havet", a book of 4 volumes
about Norwegian maritime history. The same picture is printed in a
magazine "Slekt og Data", no. 4 1997, in an article written by Yngve
Nedrebø. Here is some information from the article:

Debora was built in Kvinherreds Præstegjeld (Parish) in Søndre Bergenh.
Amt, (Rosendal) 1871-72, by Tørris Knudsen Skaaluren age 49, and Jens
Knudsen Vaag, a 38 year old farmer. Tørris Knudsen Skaaluren was the
boss. The ship hull was "kravel" built (I don't know how to explain
this, but it means that the planks were set side by side, not
overlapping each other) She had a length (keel) of 67 feet, from bow to
stern 77 feet. (Length also given to be 20 m. by Nedrebø) Dept by the
mast was 9,4 feet, and beam 21,4 feet. (ref. Sunnhordaland tingbok I.A.
57a, 1870-1874, fol. 116)

The article mentions that the son of Larsen born on the ship Aug. 17th,
was given the name "Atlanter". (from the Erik Ellingsen account 1925)

Regards, Borge Solem

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Norwegian Migration

The following information is taken from Fjord to Frontier: A History of the Norwegians in Canada by Gulbrand Loken, Toronto: 1980.
The major reason for Norwegian migration appears to be one of economics. The Norwegian farms were often small and unable to support a family. Added to that was the lack of other employment to augment the family income. Between 1850 and 1910 approximately 681,011 Norwegians made their way to America. Very few originally stayed in Canada but some, after a stay in the American west, made their way across the boarder and settled in the present provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.
One of the earliest Norwegian parties to America in the nineteenth century sailed from Stavenger on July 4, 1825. This party was lead by Kleng Pedersen (Cleng Peerson). The ship, Restauration, of 45 tons, master being Helland, was a rebuilt sloop carrying 52 passengers. To that number was added baby Larson, who was born on the voyage. Many of this party were Quakers, leaving Norway for religious reasons. The voyage took 97 days and they arrived in New York on October 9, 1825.
In 1836 the Norden and DenNorske Klippe sailed to America with 167 passengers. Another two vessels sailed the following year.
The British Government repealed the navigation laws in 1849 and from 1850 on, Canada became the port of choice as Norwegian ships carried passengers to Canada and took lumber back to Norway. The Canadian route offered many advantages to the emigrant. "They moved on from Quebec both by rail and by steamer for another thousand or more miles for a steerage fare of slightly less than $9.00. Steamers from Quebec brought them to Toronto, then the immigrants often traveled by rail for 93 miles to Collingwood on Lake Huron, from where steamers transported them across Lake Michigan to Chicago, Milwaukee and Green Bay." (pp. 13-14)
In 1855 there were eight vessels reported from Norway to Canada in the immigration report, averaging a 45 day crossing. These vessels carried 1,275 passengers. The following year, 14 vessels made the voyage averaging 54 days, and carrying 2,821 passengers. One of these vessels, the Orion from Stavanger, was said to carry 50 paupers all heading for the American west but, due to a lack of funds were sent to Buffalo. The passengers of the Gifion, all proceeded to Wisconsin.
There were a considerable number of deaths among the Norwegians in 1857. Of the 6,507 immigrants who arrived in that year there were 100 deaths. In 1859, however, emigration dropped off with only 16 vessels arriving from Norway carrying 1,756 passengers. Of the over 28,460 Norwegians who came to Canada in the 1850s it is estimated that only 400 remained in Canada the majority moved on into the American west. (p. 16)
A small settlement of Norwegians was begun at Gaspe Peninsula, Lower Canada, in 1854. A report in 1859, stated that 25 families, totaling 126 persons, were settled in the Gaspe. They were joined in 1860 by another 50 persons. However, the Norwegians were not content, and after a very hard winter in 1861-2 they began to make their way to the American west.
About 14 families who arrived on the ship Flora from Christiania in 1856 went to the Eastern Townships, near present day Sherbrooke, Quebec. They were following in the footsteps of two other Norwegians who settled in this area in 1853. "Johan Schroder, who travelled in the United States and Canada in 1863, reported that a group of Norwegian immigrants, led by an agent, settled in Bury in the Eastern Townships in 1856. One of the first settlers in this area was Captain John Svenson who died in 1878." (p. 18)

Immigration Reports Dealing with Norwegians:

You will find information on the Norwegians in some of the government immigration reports. Those of special interest are:
    •    Norway Emigrant Ships Lists
    •    Scandinavian Emigrant Ships
    •    Det digital arkiv - Arkivverket (i Norge) - National Archives of Norway
    •    Norway - to America
    •    Allan Line as transportation from this area
    •    The Great Central Railway - steamer service to Rotterdam and Antwerp and rail service from Grimsby to Liverpool docks.
 


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