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NORWEGIAN EMIGRATION - THE DEBORA EXPEDITION

A Norwegian Colonisation Undertaking


SUMMARY

The Debora Expedition sailed from Bergen in 1879 to establish a Norwegian colony on an Indian Ocean atoll called Aldabra. The organisers endeavoured to find practical and Christian people to create a settlement based on the teachings of the Norwegian preacher Hans Nielsen Hauge (1771 -1824). The expedition was aborted in Madagascar - a few of the participants remained in Madagascar and the rest settled in the British colony of Port Natal (Durban). They were the first group of Norwegian emigrants to settle in Port Natal.

The forty-seven persons who took part in the Debora Expedition were:- Captain Tobiassen and wife, mate Berentsen and wife, mate Oftedal, A Olsen and wife, I Iversen and wife, O Heidalsvig and wife (Høidalsvig - Heidalewig), J Finsen and wife, K Bang and wife with three children (Amanda, Severin and Knut), F Larsen and wife with six children (Angel, Emil, Sigvart, the three sons of the late Sivert Andersen Hordnes, and Petra, Ludvig and Karl), H Johnsen and wife with three children (Sina, Josefine and Karl), A Andreassen and wife with three children (I don't remember their names), R Andersen, R Rasmussen, K Jensen, Hesselberg, Grang, O Fosdal, E Eriksen, P Bang, E Ellingsen, widow Egelandsdal and Miss Serene Larsen. Two children were born on the voyage: a son to Mr and Mrs F Larsen and a son to Mr and Mrs Andreassen.

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DESCENDANTS OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE DEBORA EXPEDITION

Descendants of:
Ola Heidalsvig and his wife
Anna Andersdatter


Derivation and Spelling of Name: Heidalsvig - Høidalsvig - Høidalsvik - Heidalewig

Petra Johanson wrote: Mother's home was in the outer reaches of the Sogn fjord, at a place called Øen, which name in the form of Øhrn became the family surname. Father's birthplace was further north in the district of Søndmør, or as it seems to be called now, Sunnmøre. Unfortunately we know very little about his people, but we do know that his mother and stepfather lived in the small village of Høidal in Søndmør. Our step-grandfather signed himself as "Sverthommor", but in subsequent letters it was always "Høidalsvik". He took this name from the village in which he lived and that is also the name that Father bore. "Vik" means a bay or inlet and that is where "Høidalsvik"is situated. I have an old postcard which verifies this. It is a lovely name and I am sorry it had to be changed, but the English folk in Durban had much difficulty both with the spelling and the pronunciation that Willie decided to change it. I don't know that it became any easier , but he did his best, not wanting to change it too radically, so it has been "Heidalewig" down through the years.


THE HEIDALEWIG STORY - Petra Johanson

As there are those of the younger generation in the Heidalewig "clan" who are interested in the early lives of their forebears, I have delved into the few old papers and letters in my possession and the following story is the outcome.

Mother and Father (Ola Heidalsvig and his wife Anna Andersdatter) both came (to South Africa) from Norway in the year 1879 on the small sailing ship "Debora".

Mother was one of a family of ten - five boys and five girls. Their parents were devout Christians and in later years when we visited Norway, my uncle told me that their mother prayed daily for them individually, mentioning them all by name. When they were in their teens and twenties the Baptists came to Norway and such was their influence that all the boys became Baptist ministers and one of the girls married a Baptist minister, and the old parents also became Baptists eventually.

Because of this, when Father and Mother wanted to get married, they could not go to the State church for the ceremony but had to be married before a Notary Public. They had the church ceremony afterwards in the Baptist church in Bergen where they were members. I have the original document which was given to them on that occasion and it is interesting to note that they had to make the declaration themselves that they were man and wife after having been informed of the sacredness and seriousness of the undertaking.

Incidentally I have also another document dating back to October 4th 1855 which is a declaration that Mother on that day was vaccinated against small pox. Evidentally they were very particular that the vaccine should be effective and so this document declares that all the symptoms were correct and it was signed on his honour and with a good conscience by the doctor in charge and witnessed by the parish priest. Mother's home was in the outer reaches of the Sogn fjord, at a place called Øen, which name in the form of Øhrn became the family surname.

In those days it was not everyone who had a surname and they were known as the son or daughter of so-and-so. Mother's name before she was married was Anna Andersdatter. We, Bernard, Elsie, Doris and I visited her birthplace in 1954, seventy five years after she had left for Africa. She had never been back to that district again but we met two of her cousins then 85 years old, who remembered her going. There were also other relations living in the district and they certainly gave us a wonderful welcome. Relations of ours in Bergen had arranged this trip for us and it was both delightful and exciting to go with them by boat up the coast and then having to change in midstream to a smaller vessel which took us to our destination.

All the people were very friendly and we were taken to the actual place where Mother had lived with her parents and brothers and sisters. It was a small farm tucked away against the mountains and running down to the shores of the beautiful fjord. What a thrill it was to be there and to look across the waters of the peaceful bay at the Majestic mountains rising high on the other side. We also went rowing on the fjord and visited other friends in the district. We had the privilege of travelling in one of the few cars in that part of the country and it was quite a new experience to travel home from a meeting at midnight without switching on the car headlights.

Father's birthplace was further north in the district of Søndmør, or as it seems to be called now, Sunnmøre. Unfortunately we know very little about his people, but we do know that his mother and stepfather lived in the small village of Høidal in Søndmør. Each one in our family came in for a small inheritance from these dear people at the age of 18 years. I am not sure who the donor of this money was, but it may have been Father's own father.

Several of us in the family corresponded fairly frequently with our step-grandfather and I still have some of the letters he wrote in reply, but they are not very newsey so we don't learn so very much about their everyday lives, except that they did have a small farm. In one letter written when he was 83 years old he deplores the fact that his writing was so shaky. He had to steady his right hand with his left in order to write at all! And yet he wrote long letters and had a beautiful handwriting - small and very even. He had been a school teacher in his younger days for 20 years.

I have the letter which he wrote to Mother after he had heard that Father had died. It is a wonderful letter, full of comfort and encouragement and also full of concern as to how Mother would manage without him. In that letter he signed himself as "Sverthommor", but in subsequent letters it was always "Høidalsvik". He took this name from the village in which he lived and that is also the name that Father bore. "Vik" means a bay or inlet and that is where "Høidalsvik"is situated.

I have an old postcard which verifies this. It is a lovely name and I am sorry it had to be changed, but the English folk in Durban had much difficulty both with the spelling and the pronunciation that Willie decided to change it. I don't know that it became any easier , but he did his best, not wanting to change it too radically, so it has been "Heidalewig" down through the years.

It was on July 19th, 1879, that Mother and Father left Bergen, Norway, a month after their wedding on June 23rd. The captain of the vessel had planned to take the usual route down through the English Channel, but as the wind was contrary he decided on another course via the Shetland Islands to the north of Scotland which proved to be successful and they made good headway.

The ship was very small being only about 90 tons, but it was evidently a sturdy and quite commodious vessel as there were 47 passengers on board and there was sufficient food and water to last them the whole three months till they arrived at Tulear in Madagascar without calling at any port on the way.

Two babies were born on the voyage and one was called Atlanta (Atlanter) because he was born on the Atlantic ocean. He, with his parents Mr and Mrs Larsen and the rest of the family found their home in the Port Shepstone district.

It seems that most of the men on board helped with the work of sailing and steering the ship and all went well except for some days of stormy weather near Port Elizabeth. But it was quite a harrowing ordeal, as it seems that a rather inexperienced person was at the helm and had got the ship into an awkward position so that the rough seas suddenly swept over the deck throwing men and women off balance and down on to the deck.

Children had been playing on the deck shortly before but had fortunately gone down to the cabin, otherwise they might have been washed overboard. Capable hands took command of the situation and the little ship righted itself and once more rode the waves "like a duck"as the report says. A thanksgiving service was held after this experience giving thanks to God for His care and protection.

There was tremendous excitement and joy when they came in sight of land at the Cape. They had been at sea for 76 days and had seen nothing but sea and sky so the prospect of seeing land again was overwhelming . When at last the lookout cried "Land ahead" their joy knew no bounds and everyone was on deck straining their eyes to see what proved to be Table Mountain in all its beauty. But they did not land at the Cape and went on along the coast making good time.

They passed a German vessel on its way from Cape Town to Port Elizabeth and they signalled to each other. They were given the information that the war in Natal which had been raging for some time, was now over. This was the war at Rorke's Drift and Isandhlwana which was evidently of countrywide concern.

The Debora arrived at Tulear in Madgascar on October 17th, 1879. Mother told me in later years that when the women and children in the company saw the naked black heathen for the first time they cried in panic! They had never seen such people before and were almost terrified.

The original idea of those pioneers was that they should go to the Aldabra Islands north of Madagascar and settle there. They were reported to be rich in minerals and timber but those who had been there to investigate found that they were not suitable for habitation having no fresh water, so that idea was abandoned and some of the party decided to stay at Madagascar where a Lutheran missionary was stationed and also some Norwegian traders. It is interesting to note that Uncle Bang was one of the emigrants on board the Debora. Some of his relation stayed on at Madagascar and descendants of the old folk are still there. He was a boy of fourteen at the time and little did he know that he would meet his bride in this country - a daughter of the Daniel Nielsens.

Those who decided to come on to Natal arrived in Durban on November 11th, 1879. On the fiftieth anniversary of that date there was a write-up in the Natal Mercury about the expedition. A picture was also taken of the surviving members of the company and was also published in the paper. There are only six on the picture and is is possible that there were others in different parts of the country who were not contacted. Those on the picture include Mother, and Uncle Bang and also a Mrs Iversen, mother of Mrs Wall who died recently in Zululand and with whom I went to school together with her sister.

Mother and Father must have been in contact with the Daniel Nielsens, as shortly after their arrival in Durban they set off for the North Coast. They travelled as far as Verulam by train, that being as far as it went at that time, and were met by Daniel Nielsen himself who took them to his home at Entembeni, Darnall. Tante Kima was then a baby of three months. I am sure Mother and Father were glad to be in a home with friends after their long and adventurous journey.

I don't know how long they stayed there but they evidently went up to Zululand later where Father did some building, probably for missionaries, and where they lived in very primitive conditions but happy to be working in the land of their adoption. Both Bertha and Willie were born in Zululand as well as another baby girl who died at the age of ten months.

Elsie was the next baby and possibly she too was born in Zululand but of this I am not sure. Andrew came next and he was born at Rorke's Drift in 1885. This was some years after the battle of Rorke's Drift but I believe the Witts were back there as missionaries at that time. It is possible that the next baby was also born there but he died at the age of eleven months.

In 1889 Father bought a farm in the Stanger district called "Edwexane" after the little stream that ran along the valley. Here five more children were born into the family but one boy died at the age of six years. There were eight of us who grew up together. When they came to live on this farm there were many Africans living near them and they were all heathen as there were no missionaries in that part of the country. This was a real burden on their hearts and they prayed very earnestly that God would send some missionaries who could minister to the spiritual needs of the people. Mother had a special place by a stone out in the garden where she used to go for a quiet time and there she would pray that soon the Lord would send some missionaries to that district.

In 1935 when we visited our relations in Norway my uncle told me that when my parents left Norway they had said that they wanted to go out and live as Christians amongst the heathen. This they did but they did not feel competent to do actual missionary work themselves. Well, it was not long before some missionaries arrived and the Ekutandaneni Mission Station was established, with Father helping to put up the necessary buildings. I understand from Tante Kima that it was Daniel Nielsen, her father, who decided where the mission station should be built, in collaboration with the missionaries who had come out from Norway. Many missionaries have since found a home there amongst the people. The latest missionaries to be stationed there are Nils and Thea Hagemann, who have also made of the station a beautiful home. Nils has just recently been called home to Higher Service.

I don't know much about life on the farm as I was the last baby to arrive, but I am sure that parents and children all had their work which kept them busy. Elsie has told me that Father planted coffee and the trees were lovely when they were full of the red berries. When they were ready for picking, Mother roasted the beans and ground them and her coffee was renowned for its flavour and enjoyed by all who came to our home. There were also orange trees and other useful things like sweet potatoes etc. I believe Father also had a trading store for the benefit of the neighbours, both black and white.

The older children in the family did not get much in the way of a formal education but the missionaries at Ekutandeneni helped in one way and another and I understand that both Bertha and Elsie learned the rudiments of music from one of the missionaries. Father played the guitar quite acceptably and used to play to Mother as she sat with her handwork in the evenings. Elsie was at some stage given a small organ and so there was some music in the home which was enjoyed and appreciated by the whole family.

Several of the Daniel Nielsen daughters were now married and "Bestemar" Nielsen, who was an accomplished midwife was kept busy in the various homes of her children and also of other people in the district. Our home was not left out and she was there ready to receive the little newcomer on more than one occasion, so in this way we kept in touch with one another and visits took place even if it meant a walk of ten or twelve miles. Bertha told me in later years that she had carried me on more than one occasion, probably the whole way to Bethany, where the Hagemann's had made their home. I hope I wasn't a fat baby!

Father died on May 13th 1899, one day before Elsie's 15th birthday. Bertha was then 18 years old and Willie a boy of 17 years. It was a difficult time for Mother but Willie, young as he was, shouldered the responsibility of the family. We moved to Durban the following year and lived for a short while with our good friends the Linds who later moved to Oribi Flats. Bertha had been working in Durban and Willie has taken up carpentering. He told me this had been his choice because Jesus was a carpenter! After a while we moved into our own home which Willie had bought at 148 Montpelier Road. When we moved into that house we acquired a piano and both Bertha and Elsie made good use of the lessons which they had had earlier. Willie was also learning to play the violin and was getting on very well, so what with other friends and musical neighbours we spent some happy times singing from the popular hymn book of those days - Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos.

After some happy years in that home we moved to a big house which Willie had built at 249 Avondale Road, and it was from this house that Elsie got married, having met a handsome young Australian, Ormsby Davies, who lived along the road with his Mother and brothers and Sister. He also attended the same church as we did, which was the Lambert Road Baptist Church. He kept canaries as a hobby and many were the evenings when he and Elsie would go to the beach to get "sand for the birds"and came home without any!

Earlier that same year, 1907, Oliver had decided to go to Australia. He was only seventeen at the time but wanted to try his fortunes in a new country. He was followed a little later by Andrew and they both stayed there and found work as bricklayers, and besides this making quite a name for themselves as singers in church and social circles. At about this time Willie also left home for a while. He had been persuaded by some friends to join them on an expedition to look for rubber in Maputoland from which they would make their fortunes! The expedition was a failure and all he got was malaria fever which almost cost him his life.

As the family was now smaller we moved to a house at 37 Peace Avenue and it was from here that Bertha got married, having met a young Swedish missionary, John Hjelm, who had won her heart. They were stationed in Durban for a while and lived in one half of a semi-detached house in Daisy Road and when the other half became vacant, we moved in, which was a convenient arrangement for the time being. At about this time Andrew and Oliver came back from Australia and shortly afterwards Andrew married the girl of his choice, Lily Dove, and they made their home at 148 Montpelier Road in the house which had been our first home when we settled in Durban.

Both Willie and Oliver decided to go to Johannesburg, as prospects in the building trade seemed to be quite goof at that time, so it was not long before Mother and we three girls followed. That was in about December 1910. I can still remember the excitement of going such a long way by train when the furthest I had been was from Durban to Darnall. We had of course to have special suits for travelling and I was privileged to have Tante Keta (Mrs Gorven) make me a navy blue costume. I remember going to her lovely home in Currie Road for a fitting, but the summer sun was rather strong in the sewing room and I all but fainted while she was checking on the fit. Fortunately she noticed what was happening and sat me down with a glass of water.

We duly arrived in Johannesburg and our two brothers met us at the station and took us to our new home which was in a very new suburb to the south of Johannesburg called Forest Hill. We later moved over to Rosettenville and lived at 44 Main Street. Thjere wasn't overmuch furniture in our home at that time but our brothers had seen to it that we had a piano, which was priority number one! Carrie had a lovely voice and so had Oliver and then Willie with his violin and Annie at the piano and Mother and I doing our bit, we spent many a happy hour round the piano - having added a few other hymn books to our repertoire, including Alexander's which was introduced to us by Andrew and Oliver when they returned from Australia. It had been used there at the great Chapman-Alexander meetings which both of them had attended and enjoyed.

Carrie was an efficient shorthand-typist and soon found work in the Golden City. We other two just stayed at home helping Mother with the chores. After leaving school in Durban I had started on a commercial course which was offered at the Girls' High School at that time, but on going to Johannesburg there did not seem any possibility of continuing with such studies so I stayed at home.

We all attended the Baptist Church while in Johannesburg. It was at that time situated in Plein Street and the minister was the Ref J J Doke. We became very friendly with the whole Manse family and enjoyed good fellowship with them as well as with other members of the church. It was a real spiritual home for us and I was baptised in that church.

After about three years Mother and we two younger ones came back to Natal, leaving Carrie with her brothers in Johannesburg. At this time Bertha and her husband were stationed at Bethel Mission Station. Amatikulu and we we visited them there for a couple of months. Later we went down to Red Hill and stayed with Elsie for a short while till we rented a house in East Street. Red Hill was somewhat different in those days from what it is today. The roads were sandy and the byways overgrown and thorny. Elsie and the children often came to see us and as the back entrance was quite a bit shorter than the main road she preferred to come that way, but this was uncomfortable for the small fry who liked going barefoot. Victor, being quite diminutive at the time, used to ask his Mother not to go "the debbil way", meaning the back way with its devil thorns which got into his feet.

In 1914 Bertha and her husband and family went to Sweden on furlough and while they were there the first world war broke out so for some years it was quite impossible for them to come back to this country. By the time things were more or less back to normal they had settled in Sweden and never came out again having left the Mission to which they had first belonged and joined the Pentecostals. This was a great disappointment for Bertha but she accepted the situation which was the only sensible thing to do. All her children have grown up in Sweden and hitherto have not had the opportunity of paying a visit to this country, but fortunately we and others of their relations have been able to visit them from time to time.

After a while Carrie and her two brothers came back from Johannesburg. The two "boys"went farming while Carrie stayed with us, going to work each day by train to Durban. It was decided that I should attend the Business College in Durban so I joined her in catching and sometimes nearly missing the train each morning. After some time Willie decided to build a house for us in Durban so in about 1915 we moved to 130 Venice Road and could once again renew our membership at the Lambert Road church and take our part in the Christian Endeavour meetings as well as in the Sunday School. We enjoyed being back at our home church once more, where we had been amongst the first Sunday School scholars many years earlier.

At the end of 1917 Carrie married Fred Hagemann and here a link was forged with the Daniel Nielsen family, with whom we had been associated for so long. That was the year of the great floods when bridges were washed away and both the bridegroom and the officiating minister had to come to Durban on horseback. At that time it was the custom for the minister of the Lambert Road church to visit country members both in Zululand and Natal and it so happened that the Rev G W Cross was on such a visit when the storms broke over the country. However they both arrived safely although somewhat stiff and sore after the long ride in the rain. But the bridegroom's parents as well as others in the family were not able to come and a substitute had to be found for the flower girl who should have been Dina Hagemann.

After Carrie was married it seemed sensible for us to join the men of the family in their farming projects, so once again we broke up our home and joined them at Darnall. Oliver had quite a big house on the farm he was managing so we lived with him there, while Willie farmed at Springfield just next to Bethany. Then Oliver lost his heart to Mysie McIntyre of Durban and it was not long before the wedding bells were ringing and they were married in the Lambert Road church in September 1919 and came to live on the farm he was managing. We moved to a house on the adjoining farm and then shortly afterwards found ourselves at the old Daniel Nielsen homestead, Entembeni, Willie and Bernard having gone into partnership and running that farm as well as others jointly. So there we were, back at the old home where Mother and Father were first entertained when they came to Natal so many years before - actually just 40 years later.

When we came to live at Darnall a Christian Endeavour group was formed and flourished quite well with meetings being held at various homes but mainly at Bethany. Elsie and Ormsby also came to Darnall and farmed and Andrew and Lily were storekeeping in Zululand, so we were all comparatively near one another and they also attended the meetings when possible. Then there was also the Convention which was held every year at Easter time and which make a marked impact on our lives. There were many young people around who needed spiritual help and we have reason to thank God for the messages that were brought to us by His people. It was at this time that Bernard and I became interested in one another and he realised that the Lord had other plans for his life than planting cane. We were engaged and then he went overseas to prepare for his work as a missionary and a preacher.

For a number of years Annie's health had been indifferent and she had from time to time been away for a change of climate. Early in 1924 she went to Bloemfontein and there she and Ingvald Gorven, another descendant of the Daniel Nielsens, were married. She died a few months later. At about this time Willie, whom we were beginning to think of as a confirmed bachelor, lost his heart to Florence, sister of Mysie who had married Oliver. In March 1925 they were married and about three weeks later on April 13th Bernard and I followed their good example. Both our weddings took place at Bethany in the little chapel where so many lovely meetings had been held. Uncle and Aunt Hagemann also made it possible for us to have our receptions at their home and they certainly did all they could to make the occasions as happy as they could. We look back and thank God for such warm-hearted friends.

Willie and Florence made their home at Entembeni and I went with Bernard to our home in Durban. Mother stayed for a short while with Andrew and Lily in Zululand, but when we were settled she came to live with us at Hartley Road. This became her permanent home until we moved to Sweetwaters in 1941 when Elsie took her into home and cared for her in a wonderful way until she passed away on December 29th 1941.

Only once did Mother return to her homeland and that was in 1926 when the Johanson family went on furlough to Sweden. They kindly consented to take her with them so that she could visit Bertha and her family and also her own brothers and sisters who were left of the family in Norway .That was a memorable visit for her and we were very glad that she was able to travel with such kind and considerate friends. They were already a party of eight so it was very good of them to add one more.

All my sisters and brothers have now passed on but I still have two sisters-in-law - Florence, Willie's wife and Win, Andrew's wife whom he married some years after the death of Lily. I have also a brother-in-law, Ian McIntyre who married Carrie after the death of Fred. When Father and Mother came out here they had no relations of course and I remember as a small child wishing I had an uncle or an aunt or some sort of relation like my friends had. Sometimes when we had missionaries visiting us Mother would call me in to present me to them and would say this was a "Tante"from Norway. Great was my disappointment to find that she was only a "Tante" by respectful address.

By now, almost 93 years after my parent's arrival in this country I can claim a whole host of relations. What with a husband and children and grandchildren and nieces and nephews, not to speak of grand nieces and nephews as well as great grand nieces and nephews, I am well and truly supplied with real relations - (not to speak of the ones I have inherited through my husband!). When I look back and consider the godly and devout people from whom we are descended, we have much for which to be thankful to God and I pray that we may all make the best of our heritage and live lives worthy of those who have gone before.

I have tried to make a Family Tree and trust that I have included all who belong to it, right down to the newest arrival. An asterisk* by some of the names implies that they have passed away.

Please excuse any errors or omissions which may have occurred. My sources of information have been rather scanty and I have had to rely on my memory quite a lot. The whole story is really just an outline of events but I trust that all concerned with find it interesting.


HEIDALEWIG FAMILY TREE

Derivation and Spelling of Name: Heidalsvig - Høidalsvig - Høidalsvik - Heidalewig

Petra Johanson wrote: Mother's home was in the outer reaches of the Sogn fjord, at a place called Øen, which name in the form of Øhrn became the family surname. Father's birthplace was further north in the district of Søndmør, or as it seems to be called now, Sunnmøre. Unfortunately we know very little about his people, but we do know that his mother and stepfather lived in the small village of Høidal in Søndmør. Our step-grandfather signed himself as "Sverthommor", but in subsequent letters it was always "Høidalsvik". He took this name from the village in which he lived and that is also the name that Father bore. "Vik" means a bay or inlet and that is where "Høidalsvik"is situated. I have an old postcard which verifies this. It is a lovely name and I am sorry it had to be changed, but the English folk in Durban had much difficulty both with the spelling and the pronunciation that Willie decided to change it. I don't know that it became any easier , but he did his best, not wanting to change it too radically, so it has been "Heidalewig" down through the years.

OLA HEIDALSVIG (HEIDALEWIG) AND ANNA ANDERSDATTER

Ola Heidalsvig and his wife Anna Andersdatter left Norway in the year 1879 on the small sailing ship "Debora". The Heidalsvigs were married shortly before the Debora sailed from Bergen. They arrived in Port Natal on November 11 1879. Listed below are their CHILDREN, Grandchildren, and Great Grandchildren. In the conversion to the HTML format the table has been corrupted and the names of the first two grandchildren are listed next to the parents names - this will be corrected later.

LIST THE OF DESCENDANTS OF OLA AND ANNA

BERTHA (Berte Theodore) HEIDALEWIG - MARRIED John Hjelm

Joseph*

Grace Dorothy Dorothy Ase-Marie, Hans Lennart,

m. Joseph Sandberg m. Hans Bruun Erling

Rose-Marie one child

m. Prytz

Amy

m. Arne Ellstrfm

Lilian

Emanuel Urban

m. Sara Wallander Gudrun Jan-Emil

m. Stig Anderson

Paul

m. Margaretha Jack Thove-Mart

Wallander m. Thorre

Anica Celina

m. Len Claesson

WILLIAM (Ingvald) HEIDALEWIG - married Florence McIntyre

ELSIE (Elise) HEIDALEWIG - married Ormsby Davies

Children Grandchildren Great-grandchildren

Alexander Russell Jean Elizabeth Craig, Shaun, Brett

m. Isabel Blair m. Robert Worthington

m. David Russell

m. Ann Ritson

Oliver Stuart Lara-Anne

m. Anne de Villiers

Keith

Louise

Victor Stanley Muriel Elise Michael, Lynette, Jennifer

m. Doreen Ryland m. Paul Gerber Brenda, Kevin Victor

Beryl Helen Karin, David,

m. Gunnar Johansson Helen Christine

Robert Stanley Charmaine Patricia,

m. Veronica Strydom Gavin Robert

Joyce John Bruce, Steve Brad

m. Graham Paxton

Florence Margaret Darryl Lindin Lindsay Jane, Alison Claire

m. Lindin Petters m. Pat Borchardt Gregory Lindin

Barbara

John Roland

m. Susan Cook

Norman Ormsby

m. Kay Maureen

Brendan

Robin

Cynthia

Clifford Priscilla Shaun Desmond, Angela Priscilla,

m. Ethel Ground m. Desmond Gage Belinda Marjorie

Hylton

m. Rosemary Raw

Trevor

Colin Wayne Brian

m. Lynette Forbes

Marilyn

ANDREW (Andreas) HEIDALEWIG - married Lily Dove* - married Winifred Hearn

OLIVER (Ole) HEIDALEWIG - married Mysie McIntyre

CAROLINE HEIDALEWIG - married Frederick Hagemann* - married Ian McIntyre

Edna Margaret Hazel Gregor Roderick

m. Denis Logie m. Owen Falck

Terrence

Diane

Cedric Ronald Patricia Anne Craig Gray

m. Decia Adendorff m. Barry van Rooyen

Carolyn Anne

Graham Cedric

Trevor Ronald

Raymond Vincent Ann Catherine

m. Dorothy Glennis Brenda Mary

John Bernard

Joan Winifred

m. Rodney Adendorf* Barry

Jill

Jean Lyna

Shirley Joy

Desmond Gordon Lorraine

m. Kitty Steele Gary Frederick

Alison Kari

Lynn Cheryl

ANNA MARIE HEIDALEWIG - married Ingvald Gorven

PETRA DEBORAH HEIDALEWIG - married Bernard Johanson

Sylvia Kathleen

Brian Oliver Richard Brian

m. Marion Giles

Sandra Grace

Elizabeth Petra

Elise Dorothy Grant David

m. John Hoyland Greta Ann

Janice Lynn

Peter Arne*

Elaine Joan

Doris Winifred Richard Westcar*

m. Charles Rowland

Robert

David Charles

Martin Bernard


From:       [email protected]
    Subject:     The Debora Expedition
    Date:     11 June 2007 7:40:53 PM
    To:       [email protected]


Hello!

I have read your interesting pages about the Debora Expedition.
My mother's father was a cousin to Johan Emil Hjälm, Berta Theodora
Heidalewig's husband. I have enclosed a descendant report for
Johan Emil's father that you may find interesting. This branch
of relatives was totally unknown to me until I started doing
genealogy research last year, and I have no contact with them.
It seems that at least one child of Johan and Berta, Paul Willie
Hjelm, is still alive, though - now age 84.

In the report you'll see single capital letters within parenthesis.
They are codes for which region ("län") in Sweden the city/town is
situated. Below is a map of Sweden's län:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/14/Sweden_counties.png

Best regards,
Jan Kärrman
Uppsala
Sweden

Jan Kärrman wrote: I have enclosed a descendant report for
Johan Emil's father that you may find interesting.

Descendant Report for Per Johan Jansson

Generation 1

1. Per Johan Jansson. Per Johan was born on 1842-01-23 in Rifallet, Löfåsen, Ljusnarsberg (T). He died on 1916-12-07 in Solviken, Guldsmedshyttan (T) at the age of 74 years. Per Johan was the son of Stina "Rifalls-Stina" Nilsdotter. He married Maria Charlotta Fredriksson.
Maria Charlotta Fredriksson was born on 1843-02-19. She died on 1914-12-24 in Solviken, Guldsmedshyttan (T) at the age of 71 years.
More about Per Johan Jansson:
Baptism: 1842-01-27.
Occupation: Settler.
Occupation: Lumberjack.
Residence: 1907-10-12, Guldsmedhyttan (T).
Cause Of Death: Cancer.
Children of Maria Charlotta Fredriksson and Per Johan Jansson
i. Hilda Maria Pettersson [11]. She was born on 1876-04-23 in Ljusnarsberg (T). She died on 1968-03-03 in Spånga (B).
ii. Johan Emil Hjälm [12]. He was born on 1878-08-11 in Ljusnarsberg (T). He died on 1949-08-04 in Eskilstuna Kloster (D).
iii. Arvid Pettersson [13]. He was born on 1888-08-17. He died on 1909-10-07 in Guldsmedhyttan (T).
iv. Johanna Pettersson [14]. She was born on 1881-10-19.

Generation 2

11. Hilda Maria Pettersson. Hilda Maria was born on 1876-04-23 in Ljusnarsberg (T). She died on 1968-03-03 in Spånga (B) at the age of 91 years. Hilda Maria was the daughter of Per Johan Jansson and Maria Charlotta Fredriksson.
More about Hilda Maria Pettersson:
Occupation: Seamstress/dressmaker.

12. Johan Emil Hjälm. Johan Emil was born on 1878-08-11 in Ljusnarsberg (T). He died on 1949-08-04 in Eskilstuna Kloster (D) at the age of 71 years. Johan Emil was the son of Per Johan Jansson and Maria Charlotta Fredriksson. He married Berta Teodora Höidalsvig on 1916-12-05.
Berta Teodora Höidalsvig was born on 1880-10-22 in Mhlabatini, Zululand, Sydafrika. She died on 1960-11-07 in Eskilstuna Kloster (D) at the age of 80 years.
More about Johan Emil Hjälm:
Occupation: Missionary.
Emigration: 1905-03-15, Zululand, Sydafrika.
Immigration: 1916-11-04, Götabo, Kräcklinge (T).
Children of Berta Teodora Höidalsvig and Johan Emil Hjälm
i. Grace Dorothy Hjelm [121]. She was born on 1910-06-06 in Durban, Natal, Sydafrika.
ii. Amy Viktoria Hjelm [122]. She was born on 1914-01-24 in Amatikulu, Zululand, Sydafrika. She died on 1980-10-04 in Boo (B).
iii. Berta Svea Lillian Hjelm [123]. She was born on 1915-09-29 in Kumla (T). She died on 1996-06-21 in Eskilstuna Kloster (D).
iv. Johan Viktor Emanuel Hjelm [124]. He was born on 1917-11-27 in Kräcklinge (T).
v. Paul Willie Hjelm [125]. He was born on 1922-12-16 in Stora Malm (D).
More about Berta Teodora Höidalsvig and Johan Emil Hjälm:
Marriage: 1916-12-05.

13. Arvid Pettersson. Arvid was born on 1888-08-17. He died on 1909-10-07 in Guldsmedhyttan (T) at the age of 21 years. Arvid was the son of Per Johan Jansson and Maria Charlotta Fredriksson.

14. Johanna Pettersson. Johanna was born on 1881-10-19. Johanna is the daughter of Per Johan Jansson and Maria Charlotta Fredriksson.

Generation 3

121. Grace Dorothy Hjelm. Grace Dorothy was born on 1910-06-06 in Durban, Natal, Sydafrika. Grace Dorothy is the daughter of Johan Emil Hjälm and Berta Teodora Höidalsvig. She married Alvar Viking Oscar Lagnestål.
Alvar Viking Oscar Lagnestål was born on 1912-05-26 in Västerås (U).

122. Amy Viktoria Hjelm. Amy Viktoria was born on 1914-01-24 in Amatikulu, Zululand, Sydafrika. She died on 1980-10-04 in Boo (B) at the age of 66 years. Amy Viktoria was the daughter of Johan Emil Hjälm and Berta Teodora Höidalsvig.

123. Berta Svea Lillian Hjelm. Berta Svea Lillian was born on 1915-09-29 in Kumla (T). She died on 1996-06-21 in Eskilstuna Kloster (D) at the age of 80 years. Berta Svea Lillian was the daughter of Johan Emil Hjälm and Berta Teodora Höidalsvig.

124. Johan Viktor Emanuel Hjelm. Johan Viktor Emanuel was born on 1917-11-27 in Kräcklinge (T). Johan Viktor Emanuel is the son of Johan Emil Hjälm and Berta Teodora Höidalsvig.

125. Paul Willie Hjelm. Paul Willie was born on 1922-12-16 in Stora Malm (D). Paul Willie is the son of Johan Emil Hjälm and Berta Teodora Höidalsvig. He married Gunvor Margareta.
Gunvor Margareta was born on 1938-02-18 in Bäcke (P).


Jan Kärrman wrote: Here is a map of Sweden's län:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/14/Sweden_counties.png

Sweden's Counties  (Sweden's län)




From:  Finn Amundsen <[email protected]>
Subject: Anna Andersdatter
Date: 01 August 2010 4:14:31 PM
To:   [email protected]


Hello,

I have read your account of the Debora Expedition. One of the couples on board was Ola Heidalewik (Høidalsvik), who was married to Anna Andersdatter Øen. She was the sister of my great grand mother Gjørgine Andersdatter Øen (06-05-1849 - 1907), who married my great grand father Herman Mikal Amundsen (03-03-1844 - 1927).

Anna's and Gjørgines parents were Anders Øen and Trine Monsdatter on the farm "Øen". They became members of the Baptist Church, when a brother of the two sisters returned from Bergen with A. Milde to preach the gospel at his homestead. Another brother - Jacob - became a baptist priest in USA, where he christened my grandfather.

I must note here, that my father was the only member of this family, that did not take to the baptist church, and subsequently his descendents - including me - have not been members of any church.

Many regards,
Finn Amundsen

From:  Finn Amundsen <[email protected]>
Subject: Anna Andersdatter
Date:  03 Aug 2010, at 12:01
To:   [email protected]


My grandfather - Peter Arnet Amundsen - (you can find him on Google) was born near the Sognefjord in Hyllestad, Askevold on his mothers birthplace: Øen farm, and he grew up on his fathers birthplace the nearby Smilden farm - situated down to the litte fjord Åfjorden. (I have been there. Today they breed salmon in the fjord and sell them and other products).

I have pictures of the place including Øen church, where my great grandmother was married. And Askevold church as well. They left Smilden farm when my great great grandfather died in order to make a living building houses in Trondheim and Bergen.

After marrying my grandmother in 1905 the couple emigrated to Washington State on the westcoast of USA. He worked as an architect here until they returned to Norway with their 3 children just before World War I. They settled in Tromsø, where he got a job as town architect and was allowed to work as a private architect as well.

There are several buildings in Tromsø still that he built. My father was born in Tromsø in 1917. Unfortunately his mother died in 1930 and his father - then 58 years old - became depressed, I think, and as a result my father grew up much by himself, which I think, is the reason he differed from the rest of the family.

My father met my mother in Sweden during the war - as a fugitive - and after the war they settled in Denmark, where he could get a job as meteorologist. He had studied first in Oslo, then Uppsala until he came to England in 1944 as meteorologist in the Norwegian section of the RAF.
 
Kind regards
Finn Amundsen

PS: The farm that today breeds salmon is Smilden farm. The Øen farm is situated a little higher ground quite near "Øen Church". From Øen you can look down on Smilden Farm at the water.

Note: See the following links
1) http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Askvoll_kommune
2) http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyllestad_kommune

Coordinates: 61.166667, 5.3 (Hyllestad, Norway)

MAPS OF AREA


                      
             Øen church - Øen kirke, Sørbøvåg - (Island church)


                         
                    Hyllestad Church - Photo: Egil Husabø



                                
             Hyllestad - See Red marker above & Map Below



Note:
See Salbu (Sørbø) on Route 607 - North shore of Hyllestadfjorden - This a farm were salt was processed from sea water - has the same name as the Salbu farm on the Fana fjord
Link: http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Åfjorden_(Hyllestad)
Coordinates: 61.213081,5.162201


Translation: Åfjorden is a fjord in Solund and Hyllestad municipality in Sogn og Fjordane . Area is the southernmost branch of Buefjorden lying further west. Area has a length of 22 km and extends eastward to the village Hyllestad. The last piece parts fjord into two, Hyllestad area in the South and Southern area in the north [sic]. Fjord inlet Sakrisøyna between the north and Leknes Strait of Sula . On Sula goes Dumbefjorden south of Sula from Åfjorden. East of Sula is the island crust and from here goes Storaker Sound and Counting Strait south to Losnosen, which is part of the Sognefjord .
From the north of the crust and into the fjord there are several farms and hamlets on the north side. From Eide goes Fv61 on the north side of the fjord past the harbor to Sørbø Salbu, and from here goes Rv607 into Hyllestad. By Hyllestad knitting Katlenova to 3 km beyond the fjord and parts Åfjorden in the two aforementioned fjords. The south side of the fjord is not very developed, especially in the steep inner part where the mountain rises steeply up to a height of approximately 500 meters above sea level . At the entrance to Hyllestad area is the characteristic peak Gygrekjeften on the south side with a height of 710 meters.

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